Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on YummlyShare on RedditEmail this to someone

longanisaLonganisa/longganisa is another Filipino food that is popular throughout the country. It is our local sausage or chorizo, but its origin is Spanish (longaniza). Native Filipino longganisa has different kinds depending where (town or province) they are coming from. Basically, they are grouped into two categories, the sweet longganisa (hamonado) and the garlicky/sour/salty ones (derecado). This recipe is hamonado.

It is a bit ironic, that I am living in Germany, where sausages are abound, but still craving for our own brand of sausage! I guess you can put it down to homesickness! Yup, after more than two years, I still get a bout of homesickness from time to time. But big thanks to modern technology, I can talk and see my family who are miles away every time I miss them (or vise versa)! But when I am craving for Filipino food, that is a bit more difficult. Most of them I have to learn to make myself.  And who would have thought that I am able to make this kind of stuff. But I am glad I am, but I am more glad that Armin likes them too!longanisa

 

 

4.9 from 8 reviews
Longganisa (Filipino sweet sausage)
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 14-16
 
Longganisa is popular among Filipinos served at breakfast. Try this simple longganisa recipe that can be encased in a sausage casing or simply skinless.
Ingredients
  • 600 g ground lean pork
  • 250 g ground pork fat
  • 1 head garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 3 Tbsp vinegar (coconut vinegar)
  • 1 tsp ground pepper
  • sausage casing(or wax paper for skinless)
Instructions
  1. Put all the ingredients in a bowl and mix well until fully combined. Cover bowl with a plastic wrap or transfer into a container with a cover. Let it marinade in the fridge for at least 2 hours or overnight.
  2. Close one end of a sausage casing with a knot or tie it with a thin rope or a cooking twine. Fill the sausage casing with the meat mixture. Use a funnel if you have one. Insert the nozzle of the funnel through the open end of the casing all the way to the closed end. Scoop the meat mixture, into the funnel and gently pack into the casing. Once filled tie a knot to enclose. To create the the links tie a rope or twine around it at every about 2-3 inches interval.
  3. Once in the casing they may be put in the fridge for a day to dry before freezing.
  4. To cook, place sausages (uncut) in a skillet. Using a tooth pick, prick a hole or two on each sausage then add water about halfway up the sides of the sausages and cook in medium heat. Let it simmer until water is gone. Usually, there is no need to add oil since it will have enough from the fats from the sausages itself.

longanisa

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on YummlyShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Written by Bebs

Bebs here! I love to cook and try new things and DIY projects! And although I think of myself as a homebody, I like seeing other places from time to time. If you are looking for a recipe and it ain't here, make a request and I will try my best to make it for you!

This article has 27 comments

  1. Jilliebean
    Reply

    The best longganisa recipe i tried so far! Thanks for sharing this. Do you have a recipe for lumpiang shanghai?

  2. Pingback: I. Pangkabuhayan Recipes – thestreetwriter

  3. Paulo
    Reply

    Hi Bebs! Love your simple blog page…

    Looking forward to a new recipes…

    God bless & Happy Holidays!!

  4. Pingback: Longganisa (x Longanisa): Pork Sausages of the Philippines

    • Reply

      Hi Hazel, if you can get hold of coconut vinegar then use that, but I tried it with apple vinegar which is common here in Germany and it also works.

  5. Vigile
    Reply

    This longanisa recipe is just what I need. Will try it today!

    BTW, which part of Baden-Wuerttenberg are you? You mentioned you’re in a swabisch region? I’m in Konstanz! 😀

  6. Monica
    Reply

    I love your longanisa recipe! So easy to make and soooo yummy. Can’t wait to try your other recipes. Thanks a lot, Bebs.

  7. Jenilyn Liangco Eslabon
    Reply

    thanks bebz…can i add oyster sauce or worsestershire ? can i ask a favor? i have no idea how to roll the skinless longanisa in wax paper?i need to learn because i want it to be my business…thanks big again…

  8. Jenilyn Liangco Eslabon
    Reply

    hi bebs…thanks big again for your yummy recipe…do u have a skinless longganisa recipe?

    • Reply

      Hi Jenilyn…I usually also use this same recipe to make skinless longganisa. Just roll each piece in wax or butter paper and place them in fridge overnight. 😉

  9. vermil
    Reply

    Hi Bebs,

    Thanks for a great longaniza recipe. I tried doing it minus the brown sugar and pork casing and added a 1/2 tsp more of freshly ground black pepper with about 15 cloves of minced garlic and used all lean ground pork. I wrapped it sausage-like in a tin foil and steamed it over my rice cooker w/ a steamer rack until it was done. I could store this in my freezer and could last for weeks. Every time, my family wanted to eat we just cook it on a teflon griller/sandwich maker. Not much grease but still with very good texture and distinct natural garlic-pepper-salty flavor. Family loved it every time with green papaya atsara and poached sunny side ups for our Filipino breakfast fix.

  10. Ann
    Reply

    We like it and thank you so much for the recipe. It’s been almost 15 years I haven’t have longaniza, really miss it…. Due to my heart disease and allergy problems I can only eat food that I personally prepared to control the salt and should not have preservatives and chemicals just all plain natural foods. I put less sugar and salt and add 1 tbsp of dry sherry wine . .

    • Reply

      Hi Ann, I am glad you liked the recipe. Sad to hear about your heart and allergy problems though. I know what you mean about having control on what you eat and avoiding all those chemicals and preservatives from store-bought-food that is why also prefer to make our own. By the way..adding sherry wine sounds brilliant…maybe I have to steal your idea… ;-)…thanks for sharing!

  11. Lorraine
    Reply

    Thank you for this recipe. I moved from California to Massachusetts and there is no oriental stores where I live. Growing up in a Filipino household and the food we grew up on is missed very much. My father sends me boxes but can not send me the meats. So I have to turn to the internet for recipes. So thank you so much. I will enjoy it very much. And my husband is not Filipino and he really enjoy are foods.

  12. Marlon Puyod
    Reply

    Is there any secret ingredients for longganisa? I have tried it at home but i was not able to get the exact taste the same with my purchased longganisa.

    • Reply

      Hi Marlon…I am not sure about secret ingredients, if there is I am sure they are not willing to share it because that is their advantage. But I know there are different kinds of recipes having different ingredients. First try adding more garlic and sugar. in my recipe I reduced the sugar because I do not like them too sweet. Hang them and let them dry out for some hours before packing them. Some of the recipes I read used anisado wine and also adds achuete powder. You can try that and if you do, I am also interested to know about the outcome…

    • Reply

      I know exactly how you feel Ericka! I never thought I would be making my own longanisa before I left Philippines! 😉 Thanks for stopping by!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Rate this recipe: