skip to Main Content
Subscribe to receive a free eCookbook! Sign Up!

Crispy Kare-kare

[social_warfare class="swp-wprm-custom"]

WARNING!!! Not for the faint of heart! (Literally)

Kare-kare is a popular Filipino dish served at special occasions. Try this crispy Kare-kare recipe that uses pork shank or 'pata' instead of the traditional oxtail and tripe. | www.foxyfolksy.comKare-kare is one my favorite Filipino dishes. Origin of this dish is a bit vague, most believe that it originated from Pampanga, known as the culinary center of the Philippines (which just happens to be my hometown, ehem) although some also say that it is related to indian ‘kari’ that was introduced by some Indians who settled in Cainta, Rizal in the early years but later on the dish transformed into the present form because the settlers ran out of their spices and did not know the local equivalent and where to find them so they had to make substitutes. It is a stew with meat, peanut sauce and an assortment of vegetables.  To describe how it tastes is a bit difficult. The sauce itself is not salty, in fact, others might say it is a bit bland but I guess that is what makes it good because you can get a good taste of the ingredients.  Kare-kare is always paired with ‘bagoong’ or shrimp paste to give it that distinctive taste. Traditionally, oxtail and tripe is used for this recipe, boiled several hours to make it really tender. It also gets its yellow or orange color from ‘achuete’ or annatto and the thick sauce from the combination of peanut sauce and sticky or glutinous rice paste or flour.  

Kare-kare is a popular Filipino dish served at special occasions. Try this crispy Kare-kare recipe that uses pork shank or 'pata' instead of the traditional oxtail and tripe. | www.foxyfolksy.com

But this version of Kare-kare recipe is not the traditional type. First, I did not use oxtail but instead, I used pork shank or ‘pata’ as we call it in Tagalog. Second, the ‘pata’ is first boiled and later deep-fried to make it crispy. The broth from the port shank is then used to make the Kare-kare sauce. I got this idea from a restaurant in Pampanga where my parents brought me, one time, for dinner during my previous vacation to the Philippines just so I can try this dish that they got popular for.

WANT MORE RECIPES? Subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram for all of the latest updates.

Crispy Kare-kare

Kare-kare is a popular Filipino dish served at special occasions. Try this crispy Kare-kare recipe that uses pork shank or 'pata' instead of the traditional oxtail and tripe.
[social_warfare class="swp-wprm-custom"]
Print Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Asian,Filipino
Servings: 4
Calories: 285kcal
Author: Bebs
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

FOR CRISPY PATA

  • 2 (about 1 pound each) pork shank
  • 1 big onion - - sliced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic - - crushed
  • 1 teaspoon peppercorn
  • 1 tablespoon salt - (or more)
  • water for boiling - (enough to cover meat)
  • oil - for deep frying

FOR KARE-KARE SAUCE

  • 4-5 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 small onion, - - chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic - - minced
  • 1/2 cup peanut sauce - or peanut butter (unsweetened)
  • 1/4 cup glutenous rice flour
  • 2 cups pork broth
  • 1 teaspoon annatto powder
  • 1 eggplant - - cut into slices
  • 1 bundle of string beans - cut into 3-inch (7 cm) length

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Put all ingredients for the Crispy pata (pork shank), except oil, in a pot and boil over medium-high heat for 1-2 hours or until meat is tender. Remove the meat from the broth and let the excess liquids drain out. Deep fry pork shanks in hot oil until skin gets crispy.
  • While waiting for the pork shanks to get done, prepare the sauce. In a saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add the eggplants and cook both sides until a bit brown, remove eggplants and cook the string beans next. Set them aside. Alternatively, the vegetables can also be boiled or added later when the sauce starts to thickens.
  • In the same pan, saute garlic and onion with the remaining oil just until they are soft.
  • Add 2 cups of the broth or stock and the annatto powder. Mix in the peanut sauce or peanut butter and the rice paste or flour and let it simmer until the sauce thickens. Remove from heat.
  • Assemble and serve with shrimp paste on the side. Perfect for steaming hot rice.

RECIPE NOTES

Do not use peanut butter that is sweet or too sweet. You can also grind your own roasted peanuts with a food processor.
You can also roast and grind your own sticky or glutinous rice to make the rice flour. Or just substituted with cornstarch dissolved in water.
Nutrition Facts
Crispy Kare-kare
Amount Per Serving
Calories 285 Calories from Fat 162
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 18g 28%
Saturated Fat 11g 55%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 2595mg 108%
Potassium 396mg 11%
Total Carbohydrates 25g 8%
Dietary Fiber 4g 16%
Sugars 10g
Protein 4g 8%
Vitamin A 0.5%
Vitamin C 15.7%
Calcium 3.2%
Iron 3.4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Tried this recipe? Tell us how it went. Tag us at @foxyfolksy or leave a comment and rating below.

     

Kare-kare is a popular Filipino dish served at special occasions. Try this crispy Kare-kare recipe that uses pork shank or 'pata' instead of the traditional oxtail and tripe. | www.foxyfolksy.com

Bebs

Bebs here! I love to cook and try new things and DIY projects! And although I think of myself as a homebody, I like seeing other places from time to time.
If you are looking for a recipe and it ain't here, make a request and I will try my best to make it for you!

This Post Has 7 Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Looks delicious! I love seeing different takes on childhood favorites (and Kare-kare is definitely that). Will have to try this this week.

  2. This is brilliant! Crispy pata meets kari kari. This may be my favorite PH dish and love the fresh veggies and meat condiment. My mother in law makes it with just meat and sauce and you add the cooked veggies as you see fit.

    On another note… I love your site! The pictures, history and commentary is great.

Back To Top